Currently in Guadeloupe    

Considered a tourist hotspot, Morocco immediately revealed to us a very different side. Admittedly, some areas have been affected by mass tourism, some alleyways have been transformed into gadget shops and social relations have been reduced to commercial exchanges. But, fortunately, the country would not be well summed-up by these changes!

What a joy it is to discover the authenticity of the medinas, the beauty of the Arab architecture, the know-how of the artisans, the kindness of the people.

While the medinas offer us a glimpse of an urban lifestyle that has been lost in modern Europe, the Atlas mountain range plunges us into a world of welcoming hospitality amongst breathtaking countryside. It is in the midst of these mountains that we have found what we sought: traditions, tranquility, and a brand of tourism that is much more respectful of the environment and the people.

(For greater viewing comfort, double-click on the gallery to open it in full screen mode)

Vue sur la mer et l'Afrique

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A simple crossing...

View of Morocco from the Strait of Gibraltar









The Strait of Gibraltar, two continents within sight’s distance, facing each other...
The hour or two by boat that links Spain to Morocco is for us only a stage in our journey,
a simple and rapid crossing that gives us access to a new universe to discover.
Yet it represents something completely different for the thousands of refugees or asylum seekers,
who find themselves blocked off at the northern tip of Africa, hoping to reach Europe.

While we enjoy great liberty to move, study, and live in many places around the world,
we find before us people in a diametrically opposed situation.
Whatever their stories and reasons for being here, what could justify our (in)differences?









The Strait of Gibraltar, two continents within sight’s distance, facing each other...
The hour or two by boat that links Spain to Morocco is for us only a stage in our journey,
a simple and rapid crossing that gives us access to a new universe to discover.
Yet it represents something completely different for the thousands of refugees or asylum seekers,
who find themselves blocked off at the northern tip of Africa, hoping to reach Europe.

While we enjoy great liberty to move, study, and live in many places around the world,
we find before us people in a diametrically opposed situation.
Whatever their stories and reasons for being here, what could justify our (in)differences?

Strait of Gibraltar

Entrée de la médina de Fès

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At the gates of the medinas

People passing under the Bab RCIF gate, entrance to Fez










These magnificently decorated gates with characteristic architecture open the way to the hearts of the Moroccan medinas.

We discover a labyrinth of alleys, built around magnificent mosques and populated by many artisans and merchants;
a plunge into the past which clearly contrasts with the new cities built on the outskirts.

The medina of Fez, an imperial city of Morocco that has been incredibly well-preserved since the Middle Ages,
is to this day considered the cultural and spiritual capital of the country.









These magnificently decorated gates with characteristic architecture
open the way to the hearts of the Moroccan medinas.

We discover a labyrinth of alleys, built around magnificent mosques and populated
by many artisans and merchants; a plunge into the past which clearly contrasts
with the new cities built on the outskirts.

The medina of Fez, an imperial city of Morocco that has been incredibly well-preserved
since the Middle Ages, is to this day considered the cultural and spiritual capital of the country.

Bab Rcif-Fez Gate - Fez

Un marchand de fruits dans la rue

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Traditional cities

Fruit merchant in the alleys of Fez










The lifestyle and infrastructure preserved in the hearts of the medinas
reminds us that other styles of urban planning exist
and have been forgotten much to the detriment of our globalized models.
Yet the medinas have numerous social and environmental advantages:
compact and pedestrian-friendly cities, negligible environmental impact,
local modes of consumption, social bonds, preservation of artisanship and cultural heritage…










The lifestyle and infrastructure preserved in the hearts of the medinas
reminds us that other styles of urban planning exist
and have been forgotten much to the detriment of our globalized models.
Yet the medinas have numerous social and environmental advantages:
compact and pedestrian-friendly cities, negligible environmental impact,
local modes of consumption, social bonds, preservation of artisanship and cultural heritage…

Fruit merchant - Medina of Fez

Peaux séchant au soleil

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The tanneries of Fez

Sun-dried leather around Fez








While leatherworking is one of the oldest Moroccan traditions,
Fez is one of the most renowned places for the trade, with its old tanneries
dating back several hundred years.

The work, which has barely changed in all this time,
is particularly difficult and requires leaving the skins to soak in different containers,
in some cases filled with pigeon excrement or lime, before being washed, dyed, tanned and finally dried.

It comes as no surprise that the surroundings of the city are dotted with skins exposed to the sun,
awaiting their transformation into slippers, purses, belts or other leather accessories supplying the souks!







While leatherworking is one of the oldest Moroccan traditions,
Fez is one of the most renowned places for the trade, with its old tanneries
dating back several hundred years.

The work, which has barely changed in all this time, is particularly difficult
and requires leaving the skins to soak in different containers,
in some cases filled with pigeon excrement or lime,
before being washed, dyed, tanned and finally dried.

It comes as no surprise that the surroundings of the city
are dotted with skins exposed to the sun,
awaiting their transformation into slippers, purses,
belts or other leather accessories supplying the souks!

Skins drying in the sun - Marinid Tombs, Fez

Aperçu de la médina de Marrakech

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The souks, showcases of Moroccan artisanship

Life in the souk of Marrakech










Resisting the menace of supermarkets, souks allow for the preservation of local artisans,
and therefore a better employment rate and distribution of wealth among the people.

Expertise is handed down from generation to generation in these alleys divided by sector
between metalworkers, dyers, basket-weavers, wood-turners, shoemakers, jewelers and many more...

A tradition preserved at any cost, at least as long as it doesn’t give way to the convenience of “made in China”.








Resisting the menace of supermarkets,
souks allow for the preservation of local artisans,
and therefore a better employment rate
and distribution of wealth among the people.

Expertise is handed down from generation to generation
in these alleys divided by sector
between metalworkers, dyers, basket-weavers,
wood-turners, shoemakers, jewelers and many more...

A tradition preserved at any cost, at least as long as it doesn’t give way
to the convenience of “made in China”.

Souk of Marrakesh

Vue d'un menu de restaurant à Essaouira

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An example to follow!

Restaurant with organic, local and plastic-free products










Organic, local food without plastic... and a wide choice of vegetarian dishes!
We are delighted to find this kind of restaurant, not necessarily more expensive than other places,
packed with people and much more respectful of the environment.
This mode of consumption is the best way to avoid plastic pollution, pesticides,
useless energy costs from food imports and overexploitation of soils all in one go,
all the while supporting the development of local businesses; all for healthier and more authentic food!








Organic, local food without plastic...
and a wide choice of vegetarian dishes!
We are delighted to find this kind of restaurant,
not necessarily more expensive than other places,
packed with people and much more respectful of the environment.

This mode of consumption is the best way to avoid plastic pollution,
pesticides, useless energy costs from food imports
and overexploitation of soils all in one go, all the while
supporting the development of local businesses;
all for healthier and more authentic food!

Restaurant menu - Essaouira

Vie quotidienne dans une médina marocaine

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Essaouira, where pedestrians are kings

Child skateboarding in the medina of Essaouira









Undoubtedly our preferred city,
Essaouira is distinguished by the absence (almost!) of motor vehicles in its medina.

Free from motorcycles roaming the alleys, no exhaust gas nor sound pollution,
and no need to glue yourself to the wall at the first sound of an engine!
The city breathes, and the charm it exudes is truly unique.

Between its small gate and its many alleys,
you slow and take your time, as if absorbed in another era...









Undoubtedly our preferred city,
Essaouira is distinguished by the absence (almost!) of motor vehicles in its medina.

Free from motorcycles roaming the alleys, no exhaust gas nor sound pollution,
and no need to glue yourself to the wall at the first sound of an engine!
The city breathes, and the charm it exudes is truly unique.

Between its small gate and its many alleys,
you slow and take your time, as if absorbed in another era...

Medina of Essaouira

Bateau en réparation

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Fishing port

Wooden boat in the fishing port of Essaouira










The small fishing port of Essaouira,
once the most important international commerce port for Morocco,
where merchandise was exchanged between Africa, Europe and America,
is now known for its liveliness.

On the waterfront is an important shipyard for the maintenance of trawlers or dhows
made of traditional woods, imposing ships occupying the port alongside small artisanal fishing barques...










The small fishing port of Essaouira,
once the most important international commerce port for Morocco,
where merchandise was exchanged between Africa, Europe and America,
is now known for its liveliness.

On the waterfront is an important shipyard
for the maintenance of trawlers or dhows made of traditional woods,
imposing ships occupying the port alongside small artisanal fishing barques...

Shipyard, Essaouira Port

Un enfant regarde la rue




De début juin à fin juillet, la présence des dauphins communs est particulièrement attendue
le long du littoral de la Wild Coast, par les passionnés de vie sous-marine.

Car ce sont les acteurs clés pour l'observation d'un phénomène incroyable: le sardine run!

Ce sont en effet des milliards de sardines qui migrent en banc vers le nord,
le long de la côte Est d'Afrique du Sud,
entraînant avec eux une grande variété de prédateurs!

Des centaines, parfois même des milliers de dauphins communs, grâce à leurs techniques de chasse élaborées,
rassemblent alors les sardines en bancs compacts coincés sous la surface de l'eau.

Dans une véritable frénésie alimentaire, de multiples variétés de requins, de dauphins
et d'oiseaux océaniques se regroupent autour de ce festin, lorsqu'il ne s'agit pas également des baleines de Bryde.

L'occasion rêvée pour observer un phénomène naturel rare et époustouflant...
et approcher de nombreuses espèces de requins sans avoir à les attirer par de la nourriture.

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Chefchaeouen, the sky-colored city

Little boy in the blue alleys of Chefchaouen





At the far north of Morocco,
surrounded by mountains,
sits the little blue city of Chefchaouen.

Long forbidden to Catholics,
it is considered a holy city
for the great number of mosques
and religious buildings it contains.

Today it is much more open
to the outside world,
and receives travelers of all backgrounds
who come to admire its incredible charm,
sometimes at the risk of disturbing
the quietness and authenticity of the sites...

Fortunately, only a few steps outside
of the main alleys will bring you back
to this atmosphere and the great serenity
exuded by this sky-colored city...





At the far north of Morocco,
surrounded by mountains,
sits the little blue city of Chefchaouen.

Long forbidden to Catholics,
it is considered a holy city
for the great number of mosques
and religious buildings it contains.

Today it is much more open
to the outside world,
and receives travelers of all backgrounds
who come to admire its incredible charm,
sometimes at the risk of disturbing
the quietness and authenticity of the sites...

Fortunately, only a few steps outside
of the main alleys will bring you back
to this atmosphere and the great serenity
exuded by this sky-colored city...

Alley in Chefchaouen

Ambiance de la place de Marrakech

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The two faces of Jemaa-el-Fna

People on Jemaa-el-Fna Square








At the heart of the medina of Marrakesh,
which is itself classified as a UNESCO world heritage site,
we find Jemaa-el-Fna Square, which is recognized as a
“masterpiece of humanity’s oral heritage”.

And in fact, the apparent sobriety of the place
rapidly takes on a new face at the end of the day,
when merchants come to set up
and musicians and acrobats give the square its true colors,
those of an extremely lively place where tourists mix with Moroccans
to dine and appreciate the incredible atmosphere.








At the heart of the medina of Marrakesh,
which is itself classified as a UNESCO world heritage site,
we find Jemaa-el-Fna Square, which is recognized as a
“masterpiece of humanity’s oral heritage”.

And in fact, the apparent sobriety of the place
rapidly takes on a new face at the end of the day,
when merchants come to set up
and musicians and acrobats give the square its true colors,
those of an extremely lively place where tourists mix with Moroccans
to dine and appreciate the incredible atmosphere.

Jemaa-el-Fna Square, Marrakesh

Des charmeurs tente d'attirer des touristes

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Tourist charmers

Snake trainers in Marrakech







At the heart of Jeema-el-Fna Square we unfortunately find snake “charmers” and monkey exhibitors,
constantly carrying these animals around to place them on tourists in exchange for an expensive photo.

These serpents, in addition to being a potential danger to passersby
(due to poorly removed fangs), undergo significant stress from contact with the crowd.
They are deliberately provoked to give them a more striking appearance
and are subjected to extreme treatment, so their lifespan generally doesn’t exceed a few months!

This activity is one of the most traumatic shows for wild animals,
especially given that they are captured in the wild even though they are,
for the most part, classed as endangered species.

So, as tourists... let’s not encourage these practices!







At the heart of Jeema-el-Fna Square we unfortunately find snake “charmers” and monkey exhibitors,
constantly carrying these animals around to place them on tourists in exchange for an expensive photo.

These serpents, in addition to being a potential danger to passersby
(due to poorly removed fangs), undergo significant stress from contact with the crowd.
They are deliberately provoked to give them a more striking appearance
and are subjected to extreme treatment, so their lifespan generally doesn’t exceed a few months!

This activity is one of the most traumatic shows for wild animals,
especially given that they are captured in the wild even though they are,
for the most part, classed as endangered species.

So, as tourists... let’s not encourage these practices!

Snake charmers, Jemaa-el-Fna, Marrakesh

Aperçu de la nécropole de Chellah

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Cemetery of Chellah

Stork flying over Merenid tombs











In the 13th century, the heart of a former Roman city was chosen to receive the tombs of the Marinid dynasty.
The tombs were surrounded by large walls and accompanied by a mosque and a Koran school.

Today these places bear witness to two great periods of history.
They are only troubled by the storks who have taken these ruins as their home.











In the 13th century, the heart of a former Roman city was chosen
to receive the tombs of the Marinid dynasty.
The tombs were surrounded by large walls
and accompanied by a mosque and a Koran school.

Today these places bear witness to two great periods of history.
They are only troubled by the storks who have taken these ruins as their home.

Mausoleum of Abu Al-Hassan - Rabat

Aperçu d'un bedouin dans l'oued

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The Ksars, fortified pre-Saharan villages

Fortified village of southern Morocco









The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou, located on former trade routes linking
the Sahara to Marrakesh, is a magnificent example of traditional Moroccan architecture.

This little fortified village, constructed of dirt and wood on the side of a hill,
is home to former dwellings as well as a community granary located at the summit.

Registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Ksar has been subject to many renovations.
Furthermore, some families have returned to live amongst its walls,
which is surely the best means of preserving the village and bringing it back to life.









The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou, located on former trade routes linking
the Sahara to Marrakesh, is a magnificent example of traditional Moroccan architecture.

This little fortified village, constructed of dirt and wood on the side of a hill,
is home to former dwellings as well as a community granary located at the summit.

Registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Ksar has been subject to many renovations.
Furthermore, some families have returned to live amongst its walls,
which is surely the best means of preserving the village and bringing it back to life.

Ksar of Ait-Benhaddou

Delphine à Anergui

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The Moroccan Atlas Mountains

View of Anergui Valley in the Atlas Mountains









It was in leaving the cities and venturing to the Anergui Valley,
in the Atlas Mountains, that we had the feeling of truly discovering Morocco.

Far away from the mass tourism that unfortunately produces a great flood of scams and endless solicitation,
the atmosphere here is completely different.

The calmness, the hospitality and kindness of the people,
and the beauty of the countryside compelled us to prolong our stay in this little village,
lodged with a Berber family committed to the development of responsible tourism in their community.









It was in leaving the cities and venturing to the Anergui Valley,
in the Atlas Mountains, that we had the feeling of truly discovering Morocco.

Far away from the mass tourism that unfortunately
produces a great flood of scams and endless solicitation,
the atmosphere here is completely different.

The calmness, the hospitality and kindness of the people,
and the beauty of the countryside compelled us to prolong our stay in this little village,
lodged with a Berber family committed to the development of responsible tourism in their community.

Anergui Valley

Aperçu de la vallée de Thodra

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At Idya’s

Tinghir village in the Todgha Valley






By staying with the locals in the magnificent Todgha Valley, we got to know a remarkable family who,
in addition to welcoming foreigners daily in an eco-responsible manner, are fighting a whole other battle.

In April 2017, this place witnessed a drama that moved us.

Their little girl, only 3 years old, had a fall that should
have only been a bad memory had an appropriate intervention taken place in time.
Unfortunately, after 2 long days of transfers from one hospital to the next across the whole country,
the girl died from her injuries.

The affair called out to and moved the whole nation.

Her father told us his story and about his deep commitment to improving
the quality of health services in Morocco and in these remote regions...

So that such a drama won’t happen again...




By staying with the locals in the magnificent Todgha Valley,
we got to know a remarkable family who,
in addition to welcoming foreigners daily in an eco-responsible manner,
are fighting a whole other battle.

In April 2017, this place witnessed a drama that moved us.

Their little girl, only 3 years old,
had a fall that should have only been a bad memory
had an appropriate intervention taken place in time.
Unfortunately, after 2 long days of transfers from
one hospital to the next across the whole country,
the girl died from her injuries.

The affair called out to and moved the whole nation.

Her father told us his story and about his deep commitment to improving
the quality of health services in Morocco and in these remote regions...

So that such a drama won’t happen again...

Todgha Valley - Tinghir

The Strait of Gibraltar, two continents within sight’s distance, facing each other…

The hour or two by boat that links Spain to Morocco is for us only a stage in our journey, a simple and rapid crossing that gives us access to a new universe to discover.

Yet it represents something completely different for the thousands of refugees or asylum seekers, who find themselves blocked off at the northern tip of Africa, hoping to reach Europe.

While we enjoy great liberty to move, study, and live in many places around the world, we find before us people in a diametrically opposed situation. Whatever their stories and reasons for being here, what could justify our (in)differences?

View of Morocco from the Strait of Gibraltar
Strait of Gibraltar

These magnificently decorated gates with characteristic architecture open the way to the hearts of the Moroccan medinas.

We discover a labyrinth of alleys, built around magnificent mosques and populated by many artisans and merchants; a plunge into the past which clearly contrasts with the new cities built on the outskirts.

The medina of Fez, an imperial city of Morocco that has been incredibly well-preserved since the Middle Ages, is to this day considered the cultural and spiritual capital of the country.

People passing under the Bab RCIF gate, entrance to Fez
Bab Rcif-Fez Gate, Fez

The lifestyle and infrastructure preserved in the hearts of the medinas reminds us that other styles of urban planning exist and have been forgotten much to the detriment of our globalized models. Yet the medinas have numerous social and environmental advantages: compact and pedestrian-friendly cities, negligible environmental impact, local modes of consumption, social bonds, preservation of artisanship and cultural heritage…

Fruit merchant in the alleys of Fez
Fruit merchant, Medina of Fez

While leatherworking is one of the oldest Moroccan traditions, Fez is one of the most renowned places for the trade, with its old tanneries dating back several hundred years.

The work, which has barely changed in all this time, is particularly difficult and requires leaving the skins to soak in different containers, in some cases filled with pigeon excrement or lime, before being washed, dyed, tanned and finally dried.

It comes as no surprise that the surroundings of the city are dotted with skins exposed to the sun, awaiting their transformation into slippers, purses, belts or other leather accessories supplying the souks!

Sun-dried leather around Fez
Skins drying in the sun
Marinid Tombs - Fez

Resisting the menace of supermarkets, souks allow for the preservation of local artisans, and therefore a better employment rate and distribution of wealth among the people.

Expertise is handed down from generation to generation in these alleys divided by sector between metalworkers, dyers, basket-weavers, wood-turners, shoemakers, jewelers and many more…

A tradition preserved at any cost, at least as long as it doesn’t give way to the convenience of « made in China ».

Life in the souk of Marrakech
Souk of Marrakesh

Organic, local food without plastic… and a wide choice of vegetarian dishes! We are delighted to find this kind of restaurant, not necessarily more expensive than other places, packed with people and much more respectful of the environment. This mode of consumption is the best way to avoid plastic pollution, pesticides, useless energy costs from food imports and overexploitation of soils all in one go, all the while supporting the development of local businesses; all for healthier and more authentic food!

Restaurant with organic, local and plastic-free products
Restaurant menu, Essaouira

Undoubtedly our preferred city, Essaouira is distinguished by the absence (almost!) of motor vehicles in its medina.

Free from motorcycles roaming the alleys, no exhaust gas nor sound pollution, and no need to glue yourself to the wall at the first sound of an engine! The city breathes, and the charm it exudes is truly unique.

Between its small gate and its many alleys, you slow and take your time, as if absorbed in another era…

Child skateboarding in the medina of Essaouira
Medina of Essaouira

The small fishing port of Essaouira, once the most important international commerce port for Morocco, where merchandise was exchanged between Africa, Europe and America, is now known for its liveliness.

On the waterfront is an important shipyard for the maintenance of trawlers or dhows made of traditional woods, imposing ships occupying the port alongside small artisanal fishing barques…

Wooden boat in the fishing port of Essaouira
Shipyard - Essaouira Port

At the far north of Morocco, surrounded by mountains, sits the little blue city of Chefchaouen.

Long forbidden to Catholics, it is considered a holy city for the great number of mosques and religious buildings it contains.

Today it is much more open to the outside world, and receives travelers of all backgrounds who come to admire its incredible charm, sometimes at the risk of disturbing the quietness and authenticity of the sites…

Fortunately, only a few steps outside of the main alleys will bring you back to this atmosphere and the great serenity exuded by this sky-colored city…

Little boy in the blue alleys of Chefchaouen
Alley in Chefchaouen

At the heart of the medina of Marrakesh, which is itself classified as a UNESCO world heritage site, we find Jemaa-el-Fna Square, which is recognized as a « masterpiece of humanity’s oral heritage ».

And in fact, the apparent sobriety of the place rapidly takes on a new face at the end of the day, when merchants come to set up and musicians and acrobats give the square its true colors, those of an extremely lively place where tourists mix with Moroccans to dine and appreciate the incredible atmosphere.

People on Jemaa-el-Fna Square
Jemaa-el-Fna Square, Marrakesh

At the heart of Jeema-el-Fna Square we unfortunately find snake « charmers » and monkey exhibitors, constantly carrying these animals around to place them on tourists in exchange for an expensive photo.

These serpents, in addition to being a potential danger to passersby (due to poorly removed fangs), undergo significant stress from contact with the crowd. They are deliberately provoked to give them a more striking appearance and are subjected to extreme treatment, so their lifespan generally doesn’t exceed a few months!

This activity is one of the most traumatic shows for wild animals, especially given that they are captured in the wild even though they are, for the most part, classed as endangered species.

So, as tourists… let’s not encourage these practices!

Snake trainers in Marrakech
Snake charmers
Jemaa-el-Fna, Marrakesh

In the 13th century, the heart of a former Roman city was chosen to receive the tombs of the Marinid dynasty. The tombs were surrounded by large walls and accompanied by a mosque and a Koran school.

Today these places bear witness to two great periods of history. They are only troubled by the storks who have taken these ruins as their home.

Stork flying over Merenid tombs
Mausoleum of Abu Al-Hassan - Rabat

The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou, located on former trade routes linking the Sahara to Marrakesh, is a magnificent example of traditional Moroccan architecture.

This little fortified village, constructed of dirt and wood on the side of a hill, is home to former dwellings as well as a community granary located at the summit.

Registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Ksar has been subject to many renovations. Furthermore, some families have returned to live amongst its walls, which is surely the best means of preserving the village and bringing it back to life.

Fortified village of southern Morocco
Ksar of Ait-Ben haddou

It was in leaving the cities and venturing to the Anergui Valley, in the Atlas Mountains, that we had the feeling of truly discovering Morocco.

Far away from the mass tourism that unfortunately produces a great flood of scams and endless solicitation, the atmosphere here is completely different.

The calmness, the hospitality and kindness of the people, and the beauty of the countryside compelled us to prolong our stay in this little village, lodged with a Berber family committed to the development of responsible tourism in their community.

View of Anergui Valley in the Atlas Mountains
Anergui Valley

By staying with the locals in the magnificent Todgha Valley, we got to know a remarkable family who, in addition to welcoming foreigners daily in an eco-responsible manner, are fighting a whole other battle.

In April 2017, this place witnessed a drama that moved us.

Their little girl, only 3 years old, had a fall that should have only been a bad memory had an appropriate intervention taken place in time. Unfortunately, after 2 long days of transfers from one hospital to the next across the whole country, the girl died from her injuries.

The affair called out to and moved the whole nation.

Her father told us his story and about his deep commitment to improving the quality of health services in Morocco and in these remote regions…

So that such a drama won’t happen again…

Tinghir village in the Todgha Valley
Todgha Valley - Ting

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