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Filled with ruins and archaeological sites that draw people to the country, Jordan’s rich history is without a doubt its greatest asset. These sites whisper tales of the many Biblical legends that took place on the country’s mountain tops and riverbanks and bear witness to the many people that eventually helped to create the modern state of Jordan.

In light of the conflicts that plague its neighbors, Jordan’s hospitality and stability are very impressive.

The country’s handful of nature reserves helps counterbalance the negative effects of local tourist sites, whose activities sometimes affect the land surrounding them.

(For greater viewing comfort, double-click on the gallery to open it in full screen mode)

Les ruines du temples d'Hercule à la citadelle d'Amman

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Amman, a Crossroads of Cultures

Temple d'Hercule après la pluie, Citadelle d'Amman









Ruins from a Roman forum, right in the heart of Jordan’s capital, Amman.
Considered one of the oldest cities in the world, people have been passing through
here since the 13th century BCE.

For several years now, the city has been dealing with an abrupt growth in its population,
including the arrival of refugees from Palestine, Iraq, Libya and Syria.

Although the country is dealing with economic and social tensions of its own,
Jordan’s stability in such a turbulent region is really impressive!









Ruins from a Roman forum, right in the heart of Jordan’s capital, Amman.
Considered one of the oldest cities in the world, people have been passing through
here since the 13th century BCE.

For several years now, the city has been dealing with an abrupt growth in its population,
including the arrival of refugees from Palestine, Iraq, Libya and Syria.

Although the country is dealing with economic and social tensions of its own,
Jordan’s stability in such a turbulent region is really impressive!

The Citadel of Amman

Aperçu de l'entrée du temple d'Artémis à Jerash

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Stories from Jerash

Entrée du temple d'Artémis dans la cité antique de Jerash





The ruins found all across the country tell the incredibly rich history of this region.
A long succession of cultures and civilizations have left their mark
on this land – you can sometimes find traces of all of them on one single site!

The city of Jerash was probably founded towards the end of the 4th century BCE by Alexander the Great.
It only began to gain importance during the 2nd century BCE under Greek rule, who called it “Gerasa”.
The city would then prosper under the Romans, who built theaters, baths and other buildings
like the Temple of Artemis, the largest Roman sanctuary in the city.

The Romans were followed by the Byzantines, who destroyed the temples to build churches.
In the 7th century, looting from the Persians and the Arabs along with a few earthquakes
helped to bring about the end of the city.

In the 12th century, the ruins became the stage for a battle between the Arabs
and the Crusaders, who used the Temple of Artemis as a fortress.

Today, this ancient site is finally protected and has been transformed
into one of the major tourist sites in the country!




The ruins found all across the country tell the incredibly rich history of this region.
A long succession of cultures and civilizations have left their mark
on this land – you can sometimes find traces of all of them on one single site!

The city of Jerash was probably founded towards the end of the 4th century BCE by Alexander the Great.
It only began to gain importance during the 2nd century BCE under Greek rule, who called it “Gerasa”.
The city would then prosper under the Romans, who built theaters, baths and other buildings
like the Temple of Artemis, the largest Roman sanctuary in the city.

The Romans were followed by the Byzantines, who destroyed the temples to build churches.
In the 7th century, looting from the Persians and the Arabs along with a few earthquakes
helped to bring about the end of the city.

In the 12th century, the ruins became the stage for a battle between the Arabs
and the Crusaders, who used the Temple of Artemis as a fortress.

Today, this ancient site is finally protected and has been transformed
into one of the major tourist sites in the country!

Doors to the Temple of Artemis – Jerash

Aperçu du Khazneh à Pétra

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Treasure of the Middle East

Façade du Khazneh, principal tombeau nabatéen de Pétra








The Bedouins called this “Khazneh”, “treasure” in Arabic,
in the belief that the urn hanging over the monument held a pharaoh’s fortune.

It’s true that this place excites the imagination.
However, what’s really interesting about this tomb is its façade,
which was probably built for a king about 2000 years ago.

While this is the most beautiful building left by the Nabateans,
the tomb also shows the cultural and artistic wealth brought
about by the mix of cultures here throughout history.
You can see Egyptian, Greek and Roman influences at play,
evoking the Golden Age of the merchant city of Petra.








The Bedouins called this “Khazneh”, “treasure” in Arabic,
in the belief that the urn hanging over the monument held a pharaoh’s fortune.

It’s true that this place excites the imagination.
However, what’s really interesting about this tomb is its façade,
which was probably built for a king about 2000 years ago.

While this is the most beautiful building left by the Nabateans,
the tomb also shows the cultural and artistic wealth brought
about by the mix of cultures here throughout history.
You can see Egyptian, Greek and Roman influences at play,
evoking the Golden Age of the merchant city of Petra.

The Khazneh – Petra

Aperçu des tombeaux des rois de Pétra

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Memories from Beyond the Tomb

Face aux tombeaux royaux de Pétra








By the 4th century BCE, the Nabateans slowly began to settle in Petra.
Thanks to the trade of myrrh, incense, and spices with Arabia,
they developed the area and eventually made it their capital.
They put in place highly ingenious irrigation systems that diverted,
stored and distributed water and built giant buildings such as these royal tombs.
Over 20,000 people lived in the grottos scattered around the settlement.

Afterwards, however, the city began to decline.
Stifled economically by the Romans and shaken by an earthquake
which destroyed a large number of its buildings in 363 CE,
Petra was forgotten by history until its “rediscovery” in the 19th century!








By the 4th century BCE, the Nabateans slowly began to settle in Petra.
Thanks to the trade of myrrh, incense, and spices with Arabia,
they developed the area and eventually made it their capital.
They put in place highly ingenious irrigation systems that diverted,
stored and distributed water and built giant buildings such as these royal tombs.
Over 20,000 people lived in the grottos scattered around the settlement.

Afterwards, however, the city began to decline.
Stifled economically by the Romans and shaken by an earthquake
which destroyed a large number of its buildings in 363 CE,
Petra was forgotten by history until its “rediscovery” in the 19th century!

Royal Tomb – Petra

Un chiot joue avec la longe d'un âne dans le Siq, à Pétra

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What Lies in Store for Petra?

Un chiot joue avec la longe d'un âne dans le Siq, à Pétra








Today, many Bedouins still live in Petra, and although they can no longer live in the central buildings,
nearly all of them benefit from this magnificent ancient city by working in the tourism industry.

However, this opportunity might turn against them. The promise of wealth brought about
by foreign tourists has led to child labor abuse, scams and animal exploitation.
In turn, these problems have contributed to the increased poverty of the uneducated local population,
an increase in crime and the misuse and degradation of the site.

All of this could be avoided, however, with greater restrictions on the region’s touristic development.
Until this happens, it’s up to us to discourage practices that could lead to disaster.








Today, many Bedouins still live in Petra, and although they can no longer live in the central buildings,
nearly all of them benefit from this magnificent ancient city by working in the tourism industry.

However, this opportunity might turn against them. The promise of wealth brought about
by foreign tourists has led to child labor abuse, scams and animal exploitation.
In turn, these problems have contributed to the increased poverty of the uneducated local population,
an increase in crime and the misuse and degradation of the site.

All of this could be avoided, however, with greater restrictions on the region’s touristic development.
Until this happens, it’s up to us to discourage practices that could lead to disaster.

The Siq – Petra

Aperçu du désert du Wadi Rum en Jordanie

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Ecotourism in Wadi Rum?

Désert du Wadi Rum après l'orage








The Wadi Rum Desert… The concept of ecotourism makes the most sense when it comes to pristine, untouched sites like this one.
On a large scale , tourism can be destructive, as the ecosystem is destroyed by plastic and 4x4s,
more and more concrete hotels are built and nomadic tribes are pushed further and further away.

With greater government restrictions and more environmentally-friendly tourism standards,
a lot of these negative factors could disappear. Some Bedouins already offer desert excursions in small groups,
letting you experience their culture through nights under the stars.
Hopefully these practices will be further developed and used throughout the region.








The Wadi Rum Desert… The concept of ecotourism makes the most sense when it comes to pristine, untouched sites like this one.
On a large scale , tourism can be destructive, as the ecosystem is destroyed by plastic and 4x4s,
more and more concrete hotels are built and nomadic tribes are pushed further and further away.

With greater government restrictions and more environmentally-friendly tourism standards,
a lot of these negative factors could disappear. Some Bedouins already offer desert excursions in small groups,
letting you experience their culture through nights under the stars.
Hopefully these practices will be further developed and used throughout the region.

The Wadi Rum Desert

Coucher de soleil sur la réserve naturelle de Dana

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Responsible Tourism in Dana

Crépuscule sur la réserve de Dana






Perched on the side of a mountain, the little village of Dana
offers an amazing view of the nature reserve that bears its name.

Sitting at the point where three continents collide, Dana’s wildlife and plant life
are extremely varied throughout the 320 km2 that are also home to several archeological sites.

The site is managed by the RSCN (Royal Society for the Conservation of Nature),
which seeks to protect this remarkable environment while also boosting the area’s economic development.

Abandoned in the 1970s by people looking to live in more central locations,
the village was restored via traditional means to greet tourists who come to hike,
providing a source of work for the villagers.

This approach, which helps to protect the environment, society and visitors,
has contributed to the creation of one of the first responsible tourist sites in the country.





Perched on the side of a mountain, the little village of Dana
offers an amazing view of the nature reserve that bears its name.

Sitting at the point where three continents collide, Dana’s wildlife
and plant life are extremely varied throughout the 320 km2 that are also
home to several archeological sites.

The site is managed by the RSCN (Royal Society for the Conservation of Nature),
which seeks to protect this remarkable environment
while also boosting the area’s economic development.

Abandoned in the 1970s by people looking to live in more central locations,
the village was restored via traditional means to greet tourists who come to hike,
providing a source of work for the villagers.

This approach, which helps to protect the environment, society and visitors,
has contributed to the creation of one of the first responsible tourist sites in the country.

Dana Nature Reserve

Coucher de soleil sur la Mer Morte

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The Dead Sea

Coucher de soleil au dessus de la Mer Morte







Look at the calm beauty of the Dead Sea.

Separated from the ocean, the sea was slowly formed 15 million years ago
when tectonic movement created a deep fault line and a basin.
The lowest point in the world, -424 meters, is nearby.

Its name comes from the high levels of salt in the water,
ten times higher than in any of the oceans.
This kills any form of life beyond a few bacteria.

The water’s consistency also indicates a high concentration of minerals.
Swimming, or rather floating, in these thick waters can be a very strange experience.







Look at the calm beauty of the Dead Sea.

Separated from the ocean, the sea was slowly formed 15 million years ago
when tectonic movement created a deep fault line and a basin.
The lowest point in the world, -424 meters, is nearby.

Its name comes from the high levels of salt in the water,
ten times higher than in any of the oceans.
This kills any form of life beyond a few bacteria.

The water’s consistency also indicates a high concentration of minerals.
Swimming, or rather floating, in these thick waters can be a very strange experience.

Dead Sea – Dead Sea Panoramic Complex

Concrétions salées de la Mer Morte

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The Dead Sea in Danger

Concrétions de sels de la Mer Morte





Having already lost a third of its size over the past few dozen years,
the Dead Sea is still losing about a meter of depth each year.

There are two factors to blame, beyond the already highly significant
rates of water evaporation: the drying up of the Jordan River and nearby industrial activity.

The Jordan is the main source of water flowing into the Dead Sea; however,
the intense use of its water – mostly by Israel but also by Syria and Jordan –
has reduced it by 4/5. Phosphate factories alone pump more than
250 cubic meters of water per year to use for mineral extraction.

This can have serious economic and ecological consequences.
However, solving this problem won’t exactly be easy.
Right now, the focus seems to be on finding a last-ditch attempt
to import water from the Red Sea instead of better regulating external factors.






Having already lost a third of its size over the past few dozen years,
the Dead Sea is still losing about a meter of depth each year.

There are two factors to blame, beyond the already highly significant
rates of water evaporation: the drying up of the Jordan River and nearby industrial activity.

The Jordan is the main source of water flowing into the Dead Sea; however,
the intense use of its water – mostly by Israel but also by Syria and Jordan –
has reduced it by 4/5. Phosphate factories alone pump more than
250 cubic meters of water per year to use for mineral extraction.

This can have serious economic and ecological consequences.
However, solving this problem won’t exactly be easy.
Right now, the focus seems to be on finding a last-ditch attempt
to import water from the Red Sea instead of better regulating external factors.

Salt build-up - Dead Sea

Poisson lion en plongée à l'Aqaba Marine Park

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Aqaba Marine Park

Poisson lion en plongée, dans la Réserve Marine d'Aqaba









Although the country owns only a few kilometers of Red Sea coastline, Jordan decided to protect
a large part of it with the Aqaba Marine Park nature reserve, created in 1997.
The park’s mission is to manage and protect the incredible biodiversity it shelters,
all while keeping up regulated and sustainable tourist activities.

Thanks to this, these pools of water are now home to turtles, stingrays, and moray eels
who live next to clownfish, lionfish, humphead wrasses, balloonfish and many others.
Be sure not to touch or disturb anything!









Although the country owns only a few kilometers of Red Sea coastline, Jordan decided to protect
a large part of it with the Aqaba Marine Park nature reserve, created in 1997.
The park’s mission is to manage and protect the incredible biodiversity it shelters,
all while keeping up regulated and sustainable tourist activities.

Thanks to this, these pools of water are now home to turtles, stingrays, and moray eels
who live next to clownfish, lionfish, humphead wrasses, balloonfish and many others.
Be sure not to touch or disturb anything!

Lionfish – Aqaba, Red Sea

Ruins from a Roman forum, right in the heart of Jordan’s capital, Amman. Considered one of the oldest cities in the world, people have been passing through here since the 13th century BCE.

For several years now, the city has been dealing with an abrupt growth in its population, including the arrival of refugees from Palestine, Iraq, Libya and Syria.

Although the country is dealing with economic and social tensions of its own, Jordan’s stability in such a turbulent region is really impressive!

Temple of Hercules after the rain, Citadel of Amman
The Citadel of Amman

The ruins found all across the country tell the incredibly rich history of this region. A long succession of cultures and civilizations have left their mark on this land – you can sometimes find traces of all of them on one single site!

The city of Jerash was probably founded towards the end of the 4th century BCE by Alexander the Great. It only began to gain importance during the 2nd century BCE under Greek rule, who called it “Gerasa”. The city would then prosper under the Romans, who built theaters, baths and other buildings like the Temple of Artemis, the largest Roman sanctuary in the city.

The Romans were followed by the Byzantines, who destroyed the temples to build churches. In the 7th century, looting from the Persians and the Arabs along with a few earthquakes helped to bring about the end of the city.

In the 12th century, the ruins became the stage for a battle between the Arabs and the Crusaders, who used the Temple of Artemis as a fortress.

Today, this ancient site is finally protected and has been transformed into one of the major tourist sites in the country!

Entrance to the Temple of Artemis in the ancient city of Jerash
Doors to the Temple of Artemis – Jerash

The Bedouins called this “Khazneh”, “treasure” in Arabic, in the belief that the urn hanging over the monument held a pharaoh’s fortune. 

It’s true that this place excites the imagination. However, what’s really interesting about this tomb is its façade, which was probably built for a king about 2000 years ago.

While this is the most beautiful building left by the Nabateans, the tomb also shows the cultural and artistic wealth brought about by the mix of cultures here throughout history. You can see Egyptian, Greek and Roman influences at play, evoking the Golden Age of the merchant city of Petra.

Facade of Khazneh, the main Nabatean tomb of Petra
The Khazneh - Pétra

By the 4th century BCE, the Nabateans slowly began to settle in Petra. Thanks to the trade of myrrh, incense, and spices with Arabia, they developed the area and eventually made it their capital. They put in place highly ingenious irrigation systems that diverted, stored and distributed water and built giant buildings such as these royal tombs. Over 20 000 people lived in the grottos scattered around the settlement.

Afterwards, however, the city began to decline. Stifled economically by the Romans and shaken by an earthquake which destroyed a large number of its buildings in 363 CE, Petra was forgotten by history until its “rediscovery” in the 19th century!

In front of the royal tombs of Petra
Royal Tomb – Petra

Today, many Bedouins still live in Petra, and although they can no longer live in the central buildings, nearly all of them benefit from this magnificent ancient city by working in the tourism industry.

However, this opportunity might turn against them. The promise of wealth brought about by foreign tourists has led to child labor abuse, scams and animal exploitation. In turn, these problems have contributed to the increased poverty of the uneducated local population, an increase in crime and the misuse and degradation of the site.

All of this could be avoided, however, with greater restrictions on the region’s touristic development. Until this happens, it’s up to us to discourage practices that could lead to disaster.

A puppy plays with a donkey's lanyard in the Siq, Petra
The Siq - Pétra

The Wadi Rum Desert… The concept of ecotourism makes the most sense when it comes to pristine, untouched sites like this one. On a large scale, tourism can be destructive, as the ecosystem is destroyed by plastic and 4x4s, more and more concrete hotels are built and nomadic tribes are pushed further and further away.

With greater government restrictions and more environmentally-friendly tourism standards, a lot of these negative factors could disappear. Some Bedouins already offer desert excursions in small groups, letting you experience their culture through nights under the stars. Hopefully these practices will be further developed and used throughout the region.

Wadi Rum Desert after the storm
The Wadi Rum Desert

Perched on the side of a mountain, the little village of Dana offers an amazing view of the nature reserve that bears its name.

Sitting at the point where three continents collide, Dana’s wildlife and plantlife are extremely varied throughout the 320 km2 that are also home to several archeological sites.

The site is managed by the RSCN (Royal Society for the Conservation of Nature), which seeks to protect this remarkable environment while also boosting the area’s economic development.

Abandoned in the 1970s by people looking to live in more central locations, the village was restored via traditional means to greet tourists who come to hike, providing a source of work for the villagers.

This approach, which helps to protect the environment, society and visitors, has contributed to the creation of one of the first responsible tourist sites in the country.

Twilight on the Dana reserve
Dana Nature Reserve

Look at the calm beauty of the Dead Sea.

Separated from the ocean, the sea was slowly formed 15 million years ago when tectonic movement created a deep fault line and a basin. The lowest point in the world, -424 meters, is nearby.

Its name comes from the high levels of salt in the water, ten times higher than in any of the oceans. This kills any form of life beyond a few bacteria.

The water’s consistency also indicates a high concentration of minerals. Swimming, or rather floating, in these thick waters can be a very strange experience.

Sunset over the Dead Sea
Dead Sea – Dead Sea Panoramic Complex

Having already lost a third of its size over the past few dozen years, the Dead Sea is still losing about a meter of depth each year.

There are two factors to blame, beyond the already highly significant rates of water evaporation: the drying up of the Jordan River and nearby industrial activity.

The Jordan is the main source of water flowing into the Dead Sea; however, the intense use of its water – mostly by Israel but also by Syria and Jordan –has reduced it by 4/5. Phosphate factories alone pump more than 250 cubic meters of water per year to use for mineral extraction.

This can have serious economic and ecological consequences. However, solving this problem won’t exactly be easy. Right now, the focus seems to be on finding a last-ditch attempt to import water from the Red Sea instead of better regulating external factors.

Concretions of Dead Sea salts
Salt build-up - Dead Sea

Although the country owns only a few kilometers of Red Sea coastline, Jordan decided to protect a large part of it with the Aqaba Marine Park nature reserve, created in 1997. The park’s mission is to manage and protect the incredible biodiversity it shelters, all while keeping up regulated and sustainable tourist activities.

Thanks to this, these pools of water are now home to turtles, stingrays, and moray eels who live next to clownfish, lionfish, humphead wrasses, balloonfish and many others. Be sure not to touch or disturb anything!

Lion fish in diving, in the Aqaba Marine Reserve
Lionfish – Aqaba, Red Sea

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